Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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Central Utilities Plant upgrade, Building 42C

Upgrades at the Central Utilities Plant (CUP) will help MIT lower emissions, improve campus resiliency and sustainability, and create a more flexible power system for incorporating future innovations.

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CUP viewed from Albany St (Illustration courtesy of Ellenzweig)

Central Utilities Plant upgrade, Building 42C

59 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA

Status: In construction

Themes: Renovation and renewal
Sustainability

Completion: 2020

Upgrades at the Central Utilities Plant (CUP) will help MIT lower emissions, improve campus resiliency and sustainability, and create a more flexible power system for incorporating future innovations.

Overview

CUP viewed from Albany St (Illustration courtesy of Ellenzweig)
Pedestrian pathways and landscaping (Illustration courtesy of Ellenzweig)
Interior view of control room (Illustration courtesy of Ellenzweig)
Interior view of presentation space (Illustration courtesy of Ellenzweig)
CUP viewed from Albany St (Illustration courtesy of Ellenzweig)
CUP viewed from railroad tracks near Albany Garage (Illustration courtesy of Ellenzweig)

Status

In construction

Completion Date

2020

Themes and priorities

Renovation and renewal
Sustainability

Since 1995, MIT has produced a portion of its own power on campus through a combined heat and power (CHP) process, also known as cogeneration. The plant’s natural gas turbine is approaching the end of its useful life, and MIT has initiated a project to replace this turbine, add a second turbine, and complete additional upgrades.

The upgraded Central Utilities Plant (CUP) will conserve energy and lower emissions while also improving the resiliency of the campus. Newer, more efficient equipment and state-of-the-art controls will reduce regulated pollutant emissions by more than 25% from 2014 levels and will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 10% in 2020, which will offset a projected 10% increase from 2014 GHG emissions levels due to energy demands created by new buildings and program growth. By 2020, the plant will run entirely on natural gas, eliminating the use of fuel oil except for emergencies and testing. In most situations when outside power is lost, the new turbines will maintain or restore heat and electricity for the majority of campus, safeguarding residences and protecting vital research.

By upgrading the cogeneration plant, MIT is creating a flexible power system that positions the Institute to explore emerging sustainability and efficiency measures. Able to adapt and evolve in response to advances in the energy field, the new plant is central to MIT’s commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at least 32% by 2030.

Construction on the plant is expected to begin in August 2017. Both new turbines are projected to be in service in 2020.

Image credits

Courtesy of Ellenzweig

Details

Address

59 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA

Use

Administrative

Project Team

Engineering: Vanderweil Engineers’ Power Group, Boston, MA,
Architect:
Ellenzweig, Cambridge, MA (original architect of plant building: William Welles Bosworth)
Construction manager:
Bond Brothers, Everett, MA

MIT Team: Frances Boyle, David Brown, Ken Packard

Scope

89,160 gsf

Design Features

  • Two new 22-megawatt natural gas turbines and heat recovery steam generators provide electricity, steam, and chilled water to campus
  • New turbines can be started even in the absence of external power
  • Plant equipment designed and sited to keep key components above the anticipated 500-year flood level
  • Increased capacity enables the plant to meet nearly 100% of campus electricity and thermal needs (up from 60%) during most operating and weather conditions
  • Location inside plant for new Eversource regulator station that gives MIT access to high-pressure gas and allows Eversource to enhance their distribution system within the City of Cambridge

Sustainable Design Elements

  • High-efficiency cogeneration process that uses one fuel (natural gas) to produce two types of energy (electric and thermal)
  • Upgraded plant will run entirely on natural gas except in emergencies and testing situations
  • Best Available Control Technology (BACT) incorporated
  • State-of-the-art emissions controls including selective catalytic reduction that will reduce NOx (nitrogen oxides) emissions by 90%
  • Dedicated continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS)
  • Boilers converted to burn either natural gas or #2 fuel oil, eliminating the use of #6 oil on campus
  • Rooftop system will capture rainwater for use in the facility’s cooling towers, easing the burden on the city storm water system; storm water on the perimeter site area will be captured by rain gardens and through groundwater recharge

Map

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